Accountability Home


Welcome to the Office of Accountability. Our goal is to improve academic achievement for all Oklahoma students. This goal is accomplished by providing school administrators, educators, parents, and the community the tools and information needed to accelerate learning.

 

Federal Accountability

Oklahoma's assessment system, under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), has been approved by the United States Department of Education and amended by the ESEA Waiver.

ESEA Accountability Addendum

The Oklahoma State Department of Education is in the process of amending Oklahoma’s ESEA flexibility waiver. The documents listed here highlight the contents of this amendment. Some of the major changes include the definition of Full Academic Year (FAY) status and the new Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO) calculations. This replaces the NCLB Accountability Workbook that was in place before Oklahoma’s request for ESEA Flexibility.

 

Accountability Under No Child Left Behind

Prior to and through School Year 2010-11, No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) required all states, including Oklahoma, to establish state academic standards and assessments that meet federal requirements for monitoring the Adequate Yearly Progress of schools.  Failure to meet Adequate Yearly Progress resulted in a district or school being placed in District/School in Need of Improvement status.

SY 2011-12:  Oklahoma submitted a request to the U.S. Department of Education for waivers of certain ESEA requirements.  These waivers  allow the State to implement a series of reforms that will lead to college, career, and citizen readiness for all students.  The reforms are explained in the waiver request which was developed with input from educators and the public.

District Accountability

Prior to receiving the ESEA Waiver, the Oklahoma's Academic Performance Index (API) was created in law to measure the performance and progress of a school or district based on three components encompassing seven indicators reflective of educational success. A primary emphasis was placed on state test scores. Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) was based on federally approved state defined performance benchmarks. Schools that failed to meet the AYP benchmarks faced a number of possible sanctions outlined by the federal law.

After receiving the ESEA Waiver, the state identifies schools as Priority, Focus, Targeted Intervention or Reward. Additionally, districts and schools will be assessed on Annual Measurable Objectives. The primary criteria used will be reading and math test score performance, reading and math growth, attendance and graduation rate.

District Report Cards

Prior to receiving the ESEA Waiver, the District Annual Report Card contained the API score for the district and each school within the district. The API was a numeric score that measures school and district performance based on a variety of educational indicators. The report card included the district API score for regular education students, math, reading, and science test results for all students within the district from the prior school year, the graduation rate for students who graduated in the standard number of years, and the professional qualifications of teachers who teach the core academic subjects within the district. It allowed schools and districts to gauge their progress toward improving student achievement. Components of the API are used to meet reporting requirements in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) (Public Law 107-110).

After receiving the ESEA Waiver, the state provides District Report Cards based on an A-F system of grading. The grades are based on performance of students in all content areas, growth of students in reading and math, and whole school performance indicators.

Site Report Cards

Prior to receiving the ESEA Waiver, the Site Annual Report Card contained the API score for a specific school site within a district. The API was a numeric score that measured school performance based on a variety of educational indicators. The report card included: the school API score for regular education students, Math, reading, and science test results for all students within the district from the prior school year, the graduation rate (if a high school) or attendance rate (if an elementary or middle school), and the professional qualifications of teachers who taught the core academic subjects within the school. It allowed the school to gauge their progress toward improving student achievement. Components of the API were used to meet reporting requirements in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) (Public Law 107-110)

After receiving the ESEA Waiver, the state provides School Report Cards based on an A-F system of grading. The grades are based on performance of students in all content areas, growth of students in reading and math, and whole school performance indicators.

NAEP Accountability

Federal law requires that states and districts, receiving Title I funding, participate in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading and mathematics assessments every two years. Schools and students selected to participate in NAEP samples provide important data that will increase the information available to educators and policymakers about the success of their elementary and secondary education programs. NAEP produces data in a number of different subject areas for the nation, participating states, and some urban school districts. The reports and data derived from the NAEP assessment are used for a variety of purposes by education leaders, policymakers, the press, curriculum specialists, teachers, researchers, and others. Visit the NAEP page for more information.

Contact Information

Office of Accountability and Assessments, (405) 522-5169
Dr. Michael Tamborski, Executive Director of Accountability
Brent King, Accountability Consultant
 
Last updated on October 7, 2014